Single Release: Dizzy & Fay, “Chocolate Cake”

Dizzy & Fay - Chocolate Cake

By now you may think I’m biased, and admittedly it’s true, the Toronto jazz duo Dizzy & Fay have stolen my heart with their love songs.  I have yet to hear a track that hasn’t melted me away, and their recent release is no different. “Chocolate Cake,” their tasty treat of a new single, proves just how much this pair were meant to be with their collaborative late night jazz songs.  Dizzy’s playful piano tunes, which are so delicately articulate, perfectly complement Fay’s tantalizing lyrics in such a way one could easily presume they have been a duo for years. 

Produced, mixed, and mastered by Dizzy (Mark Lalama); and engineered/recorded by John “Beetle” Bailey (Serena Ryder, Molly Johnson) at the Old Slumber House, “Chocolate Cake” is one of many delights that await your ears.  Stay tuned for their complete debut album, “Songbook,” which the duo anticipate releasing later next month (and I personally cannot wait to add this to my collection). 

Dizzy & Fay

​Innocently sensual, Fay (Amanda Walther) teases us from the beginning, singing of delectable indulgences: “Well I love the southern peach / Sweet on my cheek / Or a finger dip of rich creamy bleu / And there’s nothing more divine, than fine Italian wine…” Not quite done yet, she tempts us further: “…And I like to take a break / For chocolate cake / Or a jar of caviar with a spoon / Gelato on my lips / I’ll lick before it drips / But I’ll always save some room just for you.”  Ending with plenty of assurance that her sweet tooth would never spoil the temptations of her special someone, I could almost imagine Fay with her gelato posed in a vintage ad for a Roman Gelateria – she really does have a way of drawing her lyrics onto my mind’s eye.

I invite you to take a break with Dizzy and Fay, to listen and savor “Chocolate Cake,” which I’m willing to bet will have you go looking for something sweet of your own before it’s over.  As Fay devilishly reminds us: “Etiquette says when it’s offered to you / Only take one, maybe two / We both know that’s doubtful / Twirl me up a mouthful…”  But don’t worry, calories don’t count here, so go ahead and indulge.

Jess has always enjoyed a wide range of music genres and eras. Connecting deeply with classical music, she played cello from grade school through high school, and although no longer actively playing, her affinity for finding an emotional connection to music is still strong. Residing in central PA, she is new to the Canadian music scene and enjoys listening to new artists as a way to break away from “the usual.” Jess is an avid yogi who often finds a sliver of peace while on the yoga mat with good music playing in the background.

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